Southern New Mexico Beekeepers

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Southern New Mexico Beekeepers

Members: 50
Latest Activity: 20 hours ago

Another petition

Here is another petition from Credo, I don’t see a conflict in signing two petitions, we sure could use the pressure.

https://act.credoaction.com/campaign/efsa_bees/?p=efsa_bees&rc=chaser&r=6996345&id=54325-5812978-E9pvcxx

My bees thank you!

 

Discussion Forum

Dog Canyon 1 Reply

Has anyone got the bees in Dog Canyon yet? If not, I will go. Claude Claflin 575-430-2911Continue

Started by Claude Claflin. Last reply by Rob Shepler 20 hours ago.

Swarm 7 Replies

A student told me this morning that there was a swarm around one of her trees yesterday afternoon, and they were still there this morning, and they settled on the tree a bit later. I'm too new to…Continue

Started by Gloria Villaverde. Last reply by Paul McCarty on Friday.

New Hive 1 Reply

Continue

Started by Kevin W. Thatcher. Last reply by Paul McCarty Apr 10.

Pics of bees and Bloosoms

Continue

Started by Kevin W. Thatcher Apr 10.

Comment Wall

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Comment by Rob Shepler on February 26, 2014 at 8:47am

Size does matter! Do you want 100' or a 150' Fence?

Comment by Rob Shepler on February 26, 2014 at 8:02am

BEAR FENCE

 

Gerry Radcliff of the New Mexico Game and Fish will be meeting with those that want bear fences this Monday the 3rd of March at 4:00 PM. We will meet at the Forest Service Office in Cloudcroft, the address is 4 Lost Lodge Road, Cloudcroft, New Mexico.

 

VERY IMPORTANT

If you want a bear fence you need to confirm with me today or tomorrow at the latest. I need your full name, your address, and your telephone number so Gerry can have the paperwork ready and not hold you up.

 

The sign up sheet from our first seminar did NOT make it back to me, please do not assume that you are on the list!

 

Rob Shepler

rob@theriver.com

575-687-2343

Comment by Diana Calkins on February 25, 2014 at 8:30pm

Checked on the moved hive before it got dark.  They seemed a little confused yet after flying around the twigs a bit did enter the hive.  At the old site, I saw a few bees flying around but only for a few moments before heading toward the hive in its new location.  Looks like it's working out.

Comment by Kenneth Lee Henderson on February 25, 2014 at 7:31pm

Paul,

I don't necessarily want them out of the reel, just want to give them some room for expansion that might be useful and accessable. They seem happy where they are and they are doing what bees are supposed to do so I'm going to leave them alone for now. If this season goes like last season I will have plenty of chances to relocate bees and before to long I will be bee-poor like you are.

I already have the only access to the hive through the hive box entrance. Your coworker that gave us the talk said he had done it successfully. I wanted to give it a shot. Call it an experiment.

Comment by Paul McCarty on February 25, 2014 at 12:58pm

Diana - moving bees a short distance is always a hair pulling adventure. It takes about a week for them to learn where their new home is.

Kenneth - I would use foundation. If you really want them out you could also seal up the box and cavity, so they can only enter the box, and drive them out with Bee-Go or something. You could also trap them out.

Comment by Kenneth Lee Henderson on February 25, 2014 at 12:37pm

I'm not sure anyone can give me any advice on this but I want to put a few questions out there anyway.

I have a cable reel with a colony in it. They showed up last summer and got a late start so I don't think they are to the point of splitting or anything. The space available to them is a cylinder about 10"x 2'. I put a base framework of 1" x 2"  on the top of the reel and then placed a super box over the opening to accomplish 2 things; provide a secure place for a feeder, and provide a more protected entrance rather than the straight down into the hive center hole of the reel.

I want to encourage development into a regular Lang type setup so I am thinking of replacing the present super box with a full size hive box with frames, placing a divider(I think that is the correct term) with a hole for a jar feeder on top of that, followed by the old super protecting the feeder jar.

I was wondering if I should use frames with foundation or empty frames with wire?

Do I need to put a thin strip of wood on the underside of the frame top bar for the bees to start building comb from if I use just the wire?

Any other advice or suggestions are welcomed.

On another note, the swarm relocation done last week seems to be taking. The bees are still in the box and working the area. Thinking I might need to put a reducer in the opening to keep the interior of the hive warmer right now. Thoughts?

Comment by Diana Calkins on February 25, 2014 at 7:05am

Angry bees find new location.  lol!  Moved our more testy hive just now.  Piled up the brush and boards in front of the entrance and will leave it there a while.  Should it be removed within a few days, sooner, later?

Comment by Paul McCarty on February 24, 2014 at 5:52pm

My plums are blooming - also picked up a swarm today from near the golf course. We could probably start making splits and "float a check" on the queen, but I want to wait a week or two for insurance.

My bees hardly touched their stores, also, I have two boxes of extra honey left I will be using for nucs.

Comment by Diana Calkins on February 24, 2014 at 1:37pm

Went through my topbar hives just now.  Hive #1 ate all of the full bars of honey that were left for them.  That's FIVE bars: numbers 13 through 17.  Half of bars 11 & 12 had capped honey.  Worker brood was seen on bar 10, I think.  Really need to bring a notebook out there with me.  Bees were very calm.

Hive #2 is now the strongest hive and had brood starting on Bar 13; bar 12 had drone brood.  Found a full bar of capped honey.  They were relatively calm.  Glad to see we don't have to worry about swarms for a few weeks yet.  They are loving the flowering quince next to the hive.  It's in full bloom.  The wild apricot is only a couple of days behind.

Going to put a screen over the entrance tonight, then try to help Robert move hive #2 tomorrow morning.  Wish me luck.  Can't carry as much weight as I used to.

Comment by Ralph Ketter on February 24, 2014 at 10:27am

Went through my hives in La Luz this AM.  The new one (swarm from one week ago) have a good start on two new combs each about 6x6".

The stronger hive (Italian heritage) have greatly expanded the brood over several combs.  I did not observe any drones but I did observe capped drone brood at one end of the nest.  I found one queen cell that I think was old and it appeared empty but I will be keeping an eye on it as I intend to split this hive this when I see swarm cells starting.

 

Members (50)

 
 
 

Welcome

The New Mexico Beekeepers Association is a non-profit organization of private beekeepers, commercial beekeepers, persons interested in promoting the importance of the honey bee in the environment, and businesses related to the honey industry. Representing all regions of New Mexico, the Association maintains a close affiliation with the State of New Mexico's Department of Agriculture. Membership in the Association is open to all interested persons.

 

2014 Association Officers

President: Jessie Brown, president@nmbeekeepers.org

Vice President: Craig Noorlander, vicepresident@nmbeekeepers.org

Secretary: Mike Fickling, secretary@nmbeekeepers.org

Treasurer: D.J. Nickles, treasurer@nmbeekeepers.org

Board: 

Phill Remick, memberatlarge1@nmbeekeepers.org

Taylor Horst, memberatlarge2@nmbeekeepers.org

 

Membership dues are $30 per year for a family, $15 for membership from July 1-Dec 31st. 

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